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Vinyl: Beatles Stereo Please Please Me Gold Label - Superb - 1G/1R Ex/Ex

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5,800.00 GBP
(7,376.47 USD)
100.00 GBP
25 Jan 2024
15 Jan 2024
20 bids
fmMz-mwB7Rzz
3444
18
United Kingdom
Used
The Beatles
Vinyl
Parlophone
United Kingdom
Pop
1960s
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BID WITH TOTAL CONFIDENCE . MONEY BACK GUARANTEE IF NOT TOTALLY SATISFIED. SEE MY FEEDBACK. Credit to Trademark Records. I have borrowed their description and amended to suit my copy of Please Please Me. It was such a good write up, with the album history.



THE BEATLES - PLEASE PLEASE ME

1st UK STEREO PRESSING PCS 3042 with DICK JAMES Credits


YEX 94 YEX 95

MOTHERS 1 G & 1 R

This is without doubt one of the rarest, most sought after records in the world. With only extremely small amounts pressed, reportedly between 300 and 900, it is no surprise that serious collectors and Beatles fans all over the world want this great record in their collection.

These do occasionally come up for sale, but never in great condition. This one is absolutely stunning, the vinyl cover and inner sleeve are all superb excellent condition.

A Great Playing Record! A Great Cover. An Original UK PRESSING on GOLD Parlophone Labels!

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The 1st Ever pressing of Please Please Me comes with the Dick James Mus. Co. credits on the tracks on side 1. I Saw Her Standing There / Misery / Ask Me Why / Please Please Me. And on side 2. 'Do You Want to Know a Secret' and There's a Place. The second pressing correctly credits those songs to Northern Songs.


The First pressing has the Ernest J. Day cover with the Angus McBean credit in the far right corner. Making this an extreme rarity in fantastic condition.


CAT NO:....

Stereo - PCS 3042


LABEL PRESS DETAILS:

This is the original 1st Ever Stereo 1963 issue of the Holy Grail of record collecting, with GOLD labels in great condition, with "The Parlophone Co. Ltd." printed on the rim print and the rarest Z M T Tax credits.

There is No "Recording first published 1963" statement and the first ever pressing has the Dick James Music Co. credits with No "Sold in the U.K." statement, and gold tint cover. These points confirm it is an original 1963 pressing of the GOLD PARLOPHONE label. Also with the rarest ever 33 1/3 text next to the Catalogue number.

With the 1st Ever GOLD STEREO 1 1 Matrix version, MADE IN GT BRITAIN.



MATRIX NOs. ON RUN-OUT GROOVE

Side 1: YEX 94 - 1 Side 2: YEX 95 - 1



MOTHER STAMPERS:

Side 1. '' 1 G ''

Side 2. '' 1 R ''

TRACK LISTING…

Side 1; I SAW HER STANDING THERE, MISERY, ANNA, CHAINS, BOYS, ASK ME WHY, PLEASE PLEASE ME.

Side 2; LOVE ME DO, PS I LOVE YOU, BABY IT'S YOU, DO YOU WANT TO KNOW A SECRET, A TASTE OF HONEY, THERE'S A PLACE, TWIST AND SHOUT.

An exceptional pressing in very clean condition that plays brilliantly from start to finish. An original 1963 RARE GOLD pressing of one of The Beatles most sought after LP's.

Please Please Me is the debut album by The Beatles. Parlophone rush-released the album on 22 March 1963 in the United Kingdom to capitalise on the success of singles "Please Please Me", which went to number one on most lists. Of the album's fourteen songs, eight were written by Lennon/McCartney, early evidence of what Rolling Stone later called "[their invention of] the idea of the self-contained rock band, writing their own hits and playing their own instruments."

On Monday, 11 February 1963, The Beatles and George Martin started recording what was essentially their live act in 1963, and finished 585 minutes later (9 hours and 45 minutes). In three sessions that day (each lasting approximately three hours) they produced an authentic representation of the band's Cavern Club-era sound, with very few overdubs and edits. Optimistically, only two sessions were originally booked by Martin, with the evening session added later. George Martin initially contemplated recording the album live at the Cavern in front of the group's home audience and visited the Liverpool club on 9 December 1962 to consider the technicalities. When time constraints intervened, he decided to book them at EMI Studios in Abbey Road instead and record them virtually live. Martin said, "It was a straightforward performance of their stage repertoire — a broadcast, more or less."

The day ended with a cover of "Twist and Shout", which had to be recorded last because John Lennon had a particularly bad cold and Martin feared the throat-shredding vocal would ruin Lennon's voice for the day. This performance, captured first take, and generally regarded as a classic, prompted Martin to say: "I don't know how they do it. We've been recording all day but the longer we go on the better they get."

The song "Hold Me Tight" was recorded during these sessions, but was "surplus to requirements" and not included on the album. "Hold Me Tight" was recorded again on 12 September 1963 for With The Beatles. The whole day's session cost around £400. George Martin said: "There wasn't a lot of money at Parlophone. I was working to an annual budget of £55,000." This budget had to cover all of the artists on Martin's roster. Individually, under a contract with the Musicians' Union, each Beatle collected a seven pounds and ten shillings (£7.50) session fee for each three hour session.

George Martin, a Fellow of the Zoological Society of London, thought that it might be good publicity for the zoo to have The Beatles pose outside the insect house for the cover photography of the album. However, the Zoological Society of London turned down Martin's offer, and instead, Angus McBean was asked to take the distinctive colour photograph of the group looking down over the stairwell inside EMI's London headquarters in Manchester Square. Martin was to write later: “We rang up the legendary theatre photographer Angus McBean, and bingo, he came round and did it there and then. It was done in an almighty rush, like the music. Thereafter, though, The Beatles' own creativity came bursting to the fore".

In 1969, The Beatles asked McBean to recreate this shot. Although the 1969 photograph was originally intended for the then-planned Get Back album, it was not used when that project saw eventual release in 1970 as Let It Be. Instead, the 1969 photograph, along with an unused photograph from the 1963 photo shoot, was used in 1973 for The Beatles' retrospective albums 1962–1966 and 1967–1970. Another unused photograph from the 1963 photo shoot was used for The Beatles (No. 1) (also released in 1963).

Please Please Me hit the top of the UK album charts in May 1963 and remained there for thirty weeks before being replaced by With the Beatles. This was highly unusual as the UK album charts at the time tended to be dominated by film soundtracks and easy listening vocalists. The Beatles first album went on the become one of the highest selling and collectable LP’s of all time.


ALBUM PLAYED FOR GRADING:

Yes – brilliant sound quality throughout. It does play with the usual low volume background crackle but no ticks or pops.

For one of the rarest records in existence it is possibly the hardest to find with great, clear audio. There are so few of these left in the world, and the vast majority were heavily played on heavy equipment that ruined the profile of the vinyl grooves and left the pieces heavily distorted and plagued by loud pops and clicks.

This amazing vinyl plays with absolutely no skips, loud pops or distortion. Some surface sound between the tracks of course. The sound is clean and crisp and absolutely wonderful.

A thick quality pressing with the wider, first pressed grooves, make the audio really pack a punch. Strong, undistorted sound, free of any loud pops or clicks, the channels are clean and unstressed. The record plays with staggering power, with a minimum of

This is a great pressing of the RAREST versions of PLEASE PLEASE ME. It plays with no loud clicks or pops anywhere and certainly NO other interference's. A little light static between tracks, but really barely any during the music, and I am being very critical. Any static that is there is very occasional, very much in the background and very hard to hear.

Great music with great clarity, I would say it would be virtually impossible to find another one with this type of sound. The music jumps out, with definition and clarity, particularly on the percussion instruments, and vocals which come through with tremendous power. As is the same with the bass guitar and drums, whilst the guitars come through crisp and clear. A superb all round example of this ultimate vinyl rarity.

I would give this great record a strict audio grading of EXCELLENT


THE COVER

The stunning first edition of please please me comes with its original cover. Possibly the rarist of all Beatles album covers. And this is the best one I've ever seen.

The cover is the rarest 1st pressing STEREO version - Printed and Made by Ernest J. Day & Co. Ltd. London with the Angus McBean credit. Only found on the first ever additions, the Angus McBean credit is placed towards the far right of the cover, with the credit text being in line with the end of the S of the word 'Songs', printed above the credit.

The front cover is in stunning, EXCELLENT condition, with a great sheen. It is flat and crisp with very little wear to the corners and minimal laminate creasing. Flip backs are intact with some light creasing.

The Spine and spine text is totally intact and the spine is undamaged, although there are some creases. The back is lovely and white.

Graded at EXCELLENT



THE LABELS

Deep colour with NO light spindle traces. The famous 1st GOLD labels are in great condition, with no scratches or writing. Great all round examples, I doubt that these could ever be bettered.

Graded at NEAR MINT.



RARITY

Without Doubt one of the rarest records in the world and the Holy Grail for Beatles Collectors.

There are literally only a number of hundreds left in the world, and most are in poor condition.

Finding an original and complete GOLD Parlophone pressing in great condition is virtually unheard of. The vinyl is so often played so much, heavily marked, scratched, with noisy, poor and distorted sound. The labels are nearly always heavily worn, with the gold seriously faded and the covers are usually trashed. Any GOLD STEREO examples with a record in good condition, that plays with super clear audio are unbelievably rare.

The cover is almost impossible to find without serious wear, even modestly worn examples are scarce.

A great cover like this, with a great piece of vinyl, makes this a truly unique opportunity. A 1st pressing in this condition makes this an incredible, genuine rarity.


A FANTASTIC OPPORTUNITY TO OWN A GENUINE HOLY GRAIL OF 20th CENTURY VINYL.

AN ULTIMATE PIECE OF MUSICAL HISTORY.